Tag Archives: Shakespeare

10 photos for 10 years…

I was nominated by my good friend Stephanie Mitchell to take part in the Performance/Artist picture challenge. The rules are that every day, you select an image from a day in the life of a Performer/Artist. The aim being to raise awareness of the arts.

Well, as its the week before Christmas I thought I’d break the rules and post my pictures all at once as I reflect on 10 years as a storyteller. The pictures I have chosen show why I am still telling stories after all these years; just look at the children’s faces.

How do you show a picture to somebody with a visual impairment?

So we reach the end of another year.  It has been very busy for me both personally and professionally as we made the move from London to Sussex and the impact that had on my storytelling work.  I have done lots of different things; from working with 47 Waltham Forest Primary Schools as part of the London Borough of Culture to storytelling in a care home for the elderly.  I have lead nursery and early years sessions and storyteller staff training sessions for Where Reading Rocks and libraries.  I had a very successful summer telling Jonathan Emmett’s “Bringing Down the Moon”, Simon James’ “The Boy from Mars” and Dom Conlon’s “Why the Cow Jumped Over the Moon” whilst my relationship with The Roald Dahl Storytelling Company saw a consolidation of “The Twits” and the launch of “The Enormous Crocodile”.  This year through my work as a storyteller I travelled from Glasgow, Plymouth, Swansea, Newcastle, Norwich, Liverpool, Guernsey and all points in between.  I thoroughly enjoyed what could be my final visits to Germany to work with Ministry of Defence schools and to the Midlands to work with US military but at the same time I did more birthday and private parties than ever before. My final thought for 2019 is about the work I have done with children with special educational needs.

In November I have been in east London working with Waltham Forest and the Borough of Culture in special educational needs environments.  I devised a sensory session exploring Walthamstow High Street and its famous market; looking at pictures from Vestry House Museum’s archive, smelling and tasting the foods of the market, listening to music and voices of the market and touching some of the goods and textiles on sale there.  In this way we told a story of a stroll through the town.

I worked with lots of children with a wide spectrum of profound and complex needs taking a little time to share each item with each audience member individually and allowing them to engage with the object (and me) in their own ways but probably the biggest challenge was working with children with visual impairment.  How do you show a map or a photograph to somebody who can’t see it?  I tried to be imaginative, scoring the outline of the image and cutting streets out of maps so they became a textural as well as a visual experience.  Speaking to the staff I worked with and reflecting on the session I feel that I could have done more to put myself in the position of the audience.  What is a map if you can’t see it?  Well, it’s a large piece of paper.  If I had presented a picture and offered more context that might have enhanced the audience experience.  So if the picture is of a market trader wearing a hat and a coat, shouting at passers-by from his fruit stall as the storyteller I could have offered a fuller description of the man, his work or had a similar hat for the audience to feel and wear so they got a better sense the image being discussed.

I enjoy running sensory storytelling sessions and have had compliments for the sessions I have been devising and running this autumn.  To this end Father Christmas has already delivered a 12ft parachute and a range of musical instruments for participants to use in my future sessions because building on what has been a fantastic year has to be my focus for the year ahead. Now that I have done it, I want to do it better.

Wishing you a Happy Christmas!

John Kirk is a professional storyteller telling stories in schools and libraries and at events and festivals.  For more information or to make an enquiry, complete a contact form.

How do you play Pass the Parcel with a deaf child?

I was invited to work at a Halloween themed birthday party for a five year old.  As the guests were going to be mainly 3-6 years old this would be completely different to other Halloween storytelling events I had done before.  Rather than trying to get the children to sit and listen I wanted to keep them as active and engaged as possible throughout our interaction so I decided to offer a single narrative about a School of Magic and to string a series of party games into the story.  We started with a craft activity (making our own school badges), before commencing a series of magical lessons including practising loading brooms (Musical Chairs) and spell casting (Pass the Parcel).  I incorporated further storytelling opportunities by using the famous Bear Hunt story; first as Follow my Leader game in which I encouraged the children to imagine and roleplay different terrains and then as a more formal storytelling (instead of a Bear in a cave we were hunting for a Spell Book in a creepy house!).

It was important to the hosts that everybody felt included.  This meant trying to ensure everybody was able to participate including a deaf child who was among the guests.  I am a fairly visual storyteller and use my face and body as well as a lot of colourful props and hats to communicate and enhance my regular repertoire but many of the games I had chosen for the party involved instruction and aural stimulus (starting and stopping music).  In the event the age of the guests proved to be almost as big a barrier to participation as deafness as some of the children were so young that they didn’t recognise the games we were playing.  Thankfully the adults stepped in to lend a hand and prevented the party from faltering.  Afterwards I was praised for the structure I offered and how I got the children involved but this was a large party and I was immensely grateful to get help from the other adults in the room.  In my experience whilst it is possible for a facilitator to encourage a child to participate, role modelling by a parent is invaluable even at a birthday party.

Although the story was very simple the narrative became key to the event and at times I was more like a compere than a storyteller or facilitator.  I set out to create something that the children would enjoy and whilst my games heavy approach led me to consider accessibility this delivery seemed to be a hit with everybody.


John was quick to suggest an exciting itinerary full of fun and games for the children. He asked all the right questions and adapted to children’s age and special requirements. He ensured helpful props for those who were deaf. John’s enthusiasm and professionalism was comforting. Children’s parties can feel stressful but he managed to take a lot of pressure off which was fantastic. My son and his friends had a wonderful time. John was ever so friendly and really engaged with children and adults. John made sure he arrived in good time to meet my son and go through the plans to ensure he was comfortable. I would use John’s service again and I highly recommend him. Thank you John so everything that you did. We are very grateful.

John Kirk is a professional storyteller telling stories in schools and libraries and at events and festivals.  For more information or to make an enquiry, complete a contact form.

I am thankful..

Some of the people I work with I will never hear from again.

Some I work with from time to time, others book me annually.

Some of the people I work with show me their world and make me want to be a better person.

Some make me feel so welcome that in time I have come to regard them as friends and look forward to seeing individuals almost as much as I look forward to doing the actual work.

The greetings card pictured was a daddy-daughter weekend project inspired by news that a one of a kind will be retiring when her school closes next summer (an Elementary School on a US military facility in the midlands).  In the time I have known this person she has paid for my visits out of her salary and I have never managed to leave her without a goody bag full of gifts not just for me but for my family.  Whilst I wish her well for the future I already miss her enthusiasm and her ability to find the best in others.  To have known her and so many other inspirational people like her I am truly thankful.

How do you sensualise Shakespeare?

This Halloween I was booked to provide entertainment at a birthday party for an 11 year old.  I selected some of my favourite spooky stories giving some of them a modern twist for the young audience (a Tudor mansion became a three bed semi).  I also decided to complement the more traditional storytelling with a sensory exercise based upon William Shakespeare’s spell from “Macbeth”, beginning “Double, double toil and trouble”.

On the night I was located away from the rest of the party.  This not only allowed me to work with the minimum of interruption but gave me the time and space to set up a series of bowls with the different elements of the spell in each.  The elements were inspired by Shakespeare’s famous verse which reads almost like a shopping list for making a really noxious potion.  Even though it is famous the language is 500 years old, some of the things on the list are unfamiliar and some could be texturally similar so it took me a lot of time to think of what to use and how to differentiate between them.  In the end I sourced a lot of the elements from the pic and mix at the supermarket (the Adder’s fork and blindworm’s sting became a jelly snake which had been covered in strawberry jelly).  For wool of bat I used wool, for howlett’s wing I used feathers and for baboon’s blood I used strawberry jam.  As this was about feeling the elements all the participants were blindfolded before the bowls were revealed and the children only saw what they’d been feeling at the end.

The effect was quite something.  Even working in small groups the children were able to terrify themselves (and each other) into overthinking what they were touching with several children unable to complete the exercise.  I had to continually remind the participants to trust me and not to talk as any discussion could spoil the experience for the next person.

The material was well received and the sensory exploration was a fun way of enhancing the storytelling.  This is definitely something I would repeat with a similar age group even if everything did end up smelling like a strawberry jelly!

John Kirk is a professional storyteller telling stories in schools and libraries and at events and festivals.  For more information or to make an enquiry, complete a contact form.

All the World’s a Stage is approved by the Arts Council

DraculaAll the World’s a Stage! has been approved by Arts Council England’s panel (which included the Royal Shakespeare Company) for inclusion in the Celebrating Shakespeare 2016 project.

What does that mean?  It means that ACE think that my work would go down well as part of the national celebration of Shakespeare and my details have been passed to nine regional organisers.

It is exciting to think that I could be bringing my slant on Shakespeare to a much wider audience because I was championed by the libraries themselves.  I’d like to thank Blackburn with Darwen who approached me about the project, Berkshire’s School Library Service who have been so supportive and all the other libraries who helped in getting me nominated for consideration.

The result of all this is that I may be winging my way to a few more libraries this year.  Watch this space!

Shakespeare in Barking and Dagenham Libraries this Easter

SHAKES RBKTOn the 8th April 2016 I’ll present All the World’s a Stage! in Barking and Dagenham libraries.  Barking and Dagenham have set up these Eventbrite links for people to register their interest in the event.

FREE tickets in Barking

FREE tickets in Dagenham

The Great Fire of London

John Kirk is a storyteller and drama facilitator specialising in drama workshops and theatre for young people.Recently I have being doing a lot of history projects in the name of education; The Gun Powder Plot, The Princes in the Tower and The Great Fire of London.

In 2013 it wouldn’t be uncommon to hear that a lesson was being in some way led or influenced by an artist but theatre’s relationship with education is historic.

As a visual and aural medium theatre has always been an effective method of communicating information quickly to an illiterate society.  The Greeks used comedy and drama to make social and political points, Mystery plays were a popular way of sharing the stories of the Bible with Medieval audiences and even William Shakespeare got in on the act with a series of plays we now recognise as his histories.

John Kirk is a storyteller and drama facilitator specialising in drama workshops and theatre for young people.Why though, are there so few plays concerning The Gun Powder Plot and The Great Fire of London?

I don’t really have an answer to this but I do have a couple of theories.

In the case of The Gun Powder Plot (the failed attempt to blow up the opening of Parliament and King James I in 1605 – “Remember, remember the 5th of November”) and to some extent The Great Fire of London (a fire in Pudding Lane leads to 4 days of devastation in 1666) my initial thought is that perhaps there were plays and they weren’t good enough to survive the test of time or that I just don’t know them if they are out there.John Kirk is a storyteller and drama facilitator specialising in drama workshops and theatre for young people.

My second thought is that 17th Century England is a politically volatile place where the censor still dictates what is appropriate for the public.  The Gun Powder Plot is an attempt on the life of a reigning monarch at the beginning of the century.  In 1643 Charles I was executed after a Civil War and England became a republic for almost ten years before the restoration of the monarchy and finally James II being run out of England for being Catholic.

Socio-political statement might also have jarred with the increasing public appetite for Restoration Comedy as the likes of Wycherley (The Country Wife) and Moliere (Tartuffe) titillate audiences with plays about gossip and the naughtiness of society.

My final theory and the one I’m sticking to as to why there are no really great plays about two of England’s most famous historical events is health and safety.  Plays about fire and combustion tend not to mix well with wooden theatres!  Perhaps sense prevailed and they left these two topics for another generation.