How do you play Pass the Parcel with a deaf child?

I was invited to work at a Halloween themed birthday party for a five year old.  As the guests were going to be mainly 3-6 years old this would be completely different to other Halloween storytelling events I had done before.  Rather than trying to get the children to sit and listen I wanted to keep them as active and engaged as possible throughout our interaction so I decided to offer a single narrative about a School of Magic and to string a series of party games into the story.  We started with a craft activity (making our own school badges), before commencing a series of magical lessons including practising loading brooms (Musical Chairs) and spell casting (Pass the Parcel).  I incorporated further storytelling opportunities by using the famous Bear Hunt story; first as Follow my Leader game in which I encouraged the children to imagine and roleplay different terrains and then as a more formal storytelling (instead of a Bear in a cave we were hunting for a Spell Book in a creepy house!).

It was important to the hosts that everybody felt included.  This meant trying to ensure everybody was able to participate including a deaf child who was among the guests.  I am a fairly visual storyteller and use my face and body as well as a lot of colourful props and hats to communicate and enhance my regular repertoire but many of the games I had chosen for the party involved instruction and aural stimulus (starting and stopping music).  In the event the age of the guests proved to be almost as big a barrier to participation as deafness as some of the children were so young that they didn’t recognise the games we were playing.  Thankfully the adults stepped in to lend a hand and prevented the party from faltering.  Afterwards I was praised for the structure I offered and how I got the children involved but this was a large party and I was immensely grateful to get help from the other adults in the room.  In my experience whilst it is possible for a facilitator to encourage a child to participate, role modelling by a parent is invaluable even at a birthday party.

Although the story was very simple the narrative became key to the event and at times I was more like a compere than a storyteller or facilitator.  I set out to create something that the children would enjoy and whilst my games heavy approach led me to consider accessibility this delivery seemed to be a hit with everybody.

John Kirk is a professional storyteller telling stories in schools and libraries and at events and festivals.  For more information or to make an enquiry, complete a contact form.